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Atlernatives to Chrome for Voice Over Studio Connections

Alternatives to Chrome for Audio Streaming Voice Over Studio Connections

Why You Need Alternatives to Chrome for Audio Streaming

There are many resources now for streaming audio over an internet browser, such as ipDTL, SessionLinkPro, and Bodalgocall. While conventional wisdom says to use such streaming services on a Chrome browser, that’s not necessarily your only, or best, choice. There are now also many alternatives to Chrome for audio streaming voice over studio connections. Chrome uses the Opus Codec for streaming audio, but what is Chrome? It’s an Open Source Chromium browser. The difference between a Chrome and Chromium browser is well explained in this How-To Geek article. There are many of those other than Chrome, and they’re not made by Alphabet / Google. So, in fact, you can use these services in most cases with any Open Source Chromium browser such as Opera or Yandex. I was the first voice over talent to test ipDTL on either of those browsers and I regularly run my sessions with the Opera browser. But why would you need alternatives to Chrome for Audio Streaming? Consider the following four points:

  1. Chrome is a big resource drain on computers. Enough said.
  2. Google is always stripping out or killing off programs and capabilities, as well as releasing incompatible upgrades. Can you trust Chrome will always work?
  3. Privacy concerns. If you don’t already know how invasive Google is, Bing or Duck Duck Go it.
  4. Redundancy and backup services. Always good policy to have backups in the toolbox for audio streaming voice over in case Chrome lets you down.

    Your Options with Google and Microsoft.

Outside of Opera and Yandex, there is another Chrome solution other than the latest Chrome browser. The support staff at ipDTL recommends using the M57 and not the latest version of Chrome. ipDTL has also released stable Chromium versions which are free to download at the Facebook ipDTL Users Group. Join up, and then search for Chromium Browsers. I highly recommend the group for all your technical questions related to ipDTL, and they’re very quick and helpful with their responses.

As for the Edge browser, they’re getting closer to supporting Opus Codec for streaming but dragging their heels. Recall that a few years back Microsoft promised a Skype TX high-quality audio streaming voice over service but that was all hype and no action. Not even an alpha version was developed. So, don’t hold your breath for that.

Streaming Audio with Firefox Quantum.

However, Firefox has upped their game in so many ways with the new Firefox Quantum browser. It’s fast, stable, and works with almost any application or site. Most of all, while Firefox has supported Opus Codec since 2012, it now supports audio streaming solutions. I’ve successfully used it on many sessions on Windows 10 with ipDTL and SessionLink Pro. Still, there is not complete support/compatibility with Firefox Quantum, but it’s very close. I asked Kevin Leach of In:Quality, the company behind ipDTL and he replied:

“Frustratingly, Firefox has always been slightly behind the Blink based browsers such as Chrome in terms of what we need to get the best out of ipDTL. That said, it’s come on some way recently and you can now run ipDTL in Firefox with just a couple of limitations, and this is a neat solution for those who have had audio problems between Chrome and Windows 10.

We’ve actually been throwing some of our own development effort into Firefox recently – as its open source structure allows us to do so – which should hopefully see things like output device selection being possible in the near future. This means that we’ll soon be able to announce full support for Firefox in ipDTL, allowing for greater flexibility in browser choice. Our contribution here will also benefit users of ipDTL ‘lookalike’ apps.”

So there you have it. If you need alternatives to Chrome for audio streaming voice over studio connections you have several choices: M57 Chrome, Custom Chromium, Opera, Yandex, and Firefox Quantum.
Good luck, and here’s wishing you a great session!

-Lance

Voice Over Rate Guides

Voice Over Rate Guides

Using Voice Over Rate Guides

When hiring a voice over talent and fixing your budget for your project, there are many variables to consider. Yet all of which can be addressed with current and accurate Voice Over Rate Guides. Especially relevant are these questions:

  1. Union or Non-Union talent?
  2. What size of market? Which domestic or international markets?
  3. Duration of use?
  4. Which media? Web Usage is not inexpensive anymore, and is now more in line with conventional broadcast.

Union and Non-Union Rates

First, let’s look at the current rates for Union Voice Over Talent with the SAG/AFTRA rate calculator. This is an excellent interactive guide to show producers exactly how much a union voice over costs and what the money goes to. Even as a non-union voice talent in a ‘Right to Work’ state, I use these standards as an important reference. An eight-week option for an internet-only commercial is $1833.30. The days of a couple hundred bucks for internet use as a side item is long past.

If you have selected a non-union voice over talent, The Global Voice Over Academy (GVAA) has an excellent rate guide for Non-Union voice over work. As well as detailing non-union and union rates for radio, television, corporate, and E-Learning voice overs, it features a breakdown for rates by US markets. Most noteworthy is the newest addition to the rates: the overview of Web Usage. This is imperative as ‘internet only’ isn’t an excuse anymore for low budgets. Furthermore, the internet is now just as important as television or radio and in many cases has greater reach and impact. The GVAA guide Web Usage covers:

  • Commercial Web-Only: Paid Placement, Pre-Roll
  • Social Media Usage
  • Non-Commercial Informational Web Videos
  • Internet Streaming Radio
  • Internet Closed Platform Radio
  • Digital Greeting Cards
  • Podcast Intro/Outro

International Voice Over Rate Guides

Gravy for the Brain put out another comprehensive rate guide for all types of media for the UK market. While I’ve seen rates slip a bit for the UK lately, especially for explainer videos, I hope this and other voice over rate guides will help reverse that trend.

In addition, French voix-off talent Thomas Dormoy discusses various rates in France in his blog here. I find that his rates are the same as my experiences with working for French clients. For a list of other recommended international voice talents, please see my post here.

One of the better European markets for requiring American English voice overs is Poland. As a result I’ve had the pleasure of working for many producers and talent rosters there, and the rate guide at Mikrofonika is thorough and well-presented. Hence, it gives a good benchmark also for comparing to other European markets outside of the UK, France, and Germany. And they have great creative projects too, like the one here where I play Leon the Cat!

Remember, just as no voice over talent is one-size-fits-all, rates will vary depending on the market, usage, and experience level of the talent. However, it is great that for both producers and talents alike that SAG/AFTRA and the GVAA have put together such comprehensive and easy-to-follow voice over rate guides. Most importantly, they both have addressed the prevalence of Web Usage and that it should be paid for accordingly.

Finally, if any of you have access to rate guides in various international markets, please write to me. I’ll add them to this post and be sure to credit you. Thank you!

All the best,
Lance

Punch and Roll

Why I Never Punch And Roll for Voice Over

Punch and Roll for Voice Over

When the voice over talent makes a mistake, using non-destructive recording in DAWs like ProTools, Cubase, or Reaper, one can roll back a few seconds before the flub and then ‘punch in’ the recording starting where the mistake was made. On Adobe Audition CC 2017 and 2018 it’s possible with this new Add-On created by Travis Baldree.  That’s “Punch and Roll” recording. It’s been around from back in the analogue recording days, but it’s a prevalent technique for Audio-books and matching sound to picture. Every voice over talent should be experienced in working in such recording sessions, and it takes extra concentration to work in this non-linear fashion. An on-camera talent can’t ‘punch in’ on the video or film quite as quickly, as the whole studio needs to reset: the camera, lighting, dolly, grips, etc.

Does Punch and Roll Save Time?

The idea in voice over is that Punch and Roll saves editing time. But does it? Yes and no. Depends on the production workflow and application.

If the talent makes a mistake or does three takes, you can either:
1.) Make one edit quickly as you review the files.

2.) Set up a Punch and Roll recording for each of the three takes.

My experience has been that Punch and Roll takes a bit longer than recording and then editing. Even when doing a session with a dedicated engineer running Punch and Roll on the DAW, those sessions can take much longer than if the client just keeps a log of the keeper takes. However, when it’s an issue of having to hit precise timing, Punch and Roll is great when working with a dedicated audio engineer in the voice over studio. And then it does save production time considerably. I’m comfortable and experienced with working in this fashion.

How I Record for my Voice Over Clients

If you or your hired editor doesn’t have time to review the whole file, then I suppose Punch and Roll is the only option. I only send files to a client that have been listened to from beginning to end (even if at 2x speed for long E-Learning Narrations). When a client is paying for a finished audio file, it must be reviewed and proofed comprehensively. There is also no guarantee that the new Punch and Roll take is done seamlessly in a way that sounds natural. It should still be reviewed afterward. In the case of full-time Audio Book narrators that have the process down cold, I defer to their ability to work this way.

However, there’s another big reason why I don’t Punch and Roll when recording at my studio for my clients. And honestly, it’s the deal-breaker for me.

Are you hiring a voice over talent or an engineer? If a talent is critiquing everything they record as they say it, they’re not in the moment as a voice over talent. Talents catch the obvious mistakes and pick them up. And I know how to make pick ups with the exact tone and volume on the fly. Headphones are for the talent to listen to direction, not to themselves! While today’s voice over talent should be competent in being able to record and edit their own work for clients, simultaneous multitasking is detrimental to solid voice acting performances. And I write this from my experience as full time audio engineer before becoming a full time voice over talent.

Punch and Roll sessions can be a fun challenge and I enjoy working that way with a dedicated engineer; but in my own recording studio, that’s just not how I (punch and) roll.

All the best,
Lance

Adobe Audition CC 2018

Voice Over Post-Production with Adobe Audition CC 2018

Adobe Audition CC 2018: A More Powerful DAW

Adobe has greatly improved Audition CC 2018 with its new release making it a more flexible and powerful DAW for voice over post-production.
What does that mean for you as an audio engineer, a voice over client, or a voice over talent?
Some of the more notable features are:

  • Auto-ducking of music beds via the Essential Sound panel.
  • Support for the Mackie HUI control surface protocol.
  • New updated version of the discontinued Premiere Pro Dynamics
  • Impressive Generate Speech function. I was able to turn a 30 minute script into a high-quality male or female computer voice in 90 seconds. The functionality of this is basic for Windows but comprehensive and very powerful on Mac versions.

Audition CC 2018 Essential Sound PanelLearning How to Make the Most of Audition

To make the most out of Adobe Audition CC 2018, you must change a setting they reversed for monitoring inputs. All one needs to do is uncheck the “Enable Smart Monitoring” preference.  Otherwise, your monitoring will loopback while recording.  Choose “Preferences>Multitrack>When Arming Tracks For Record>Enable Smart Monitoring”. Then to monitor while recording, click the “I” button on the channel strip. Nice of Adobe not to warn anybody about this ahead of time, but now you know!

For a full list of the new features, check them out at the Adobe Audition site.

Audio Engineer Mike Russell has a helpful YouTube playlist of all his video tutorials about using the new features in practice.

I’ve really enjoyed using AA CC 2017 this year as an upgrade to my previous Adobe Audition 3 recording software. My only two complaints have been the obvious ones shared by other users. First, the subscription price is steep compared to other DAWs. Second, automatic upgrades have been deleting user Keyboard Shortcuts.

Note that when you upgrade from Audition CC 2017 to the 2018 version check to see if you will have to re-enter those Keyboard Shortcuts. Mine saved perfectly, thankfully. Also, you will need to re-load your VST and VST3 plugins, and then assign shortcuts for those. Perhaps most importantly, make sure that you go to Edit > Preferences > Audio Hardware to make sure it is seeing your settings for your audio interface properly. It will default to MME in most Windows computers, so be sure to select ASIO under “Device Class” drop-down menu in the Audio Hardware page.

The Essential Sound Panel will be very helpful for audio editors when mixing sound and narration. My favorite preset in name at least is “That Public Radio Sound” which indeed does not disappoint, just like the rest of this new Audition upgrade. My hope is that most of these presets are not-very subtle, especially the impact of compression, and that most people will adhere to the rule “if you notice the effect of an Effect, dial it back.” But it’s nice to have these tools in the kit with Adobe Audition CC 2018 for Voice Over Production. I’m finding that the Vocal Enhancer setting which has male and female settings are pretty much a set it and forget it solution for full sounding voice over auditions, and could be a great tool for editors on a tight schedule.

All the very best,
Lance

 

How Do You Playback Audio to Voice Over Clients? Soundcraft Signature 10 Mixer

How Do You Playback Audio to Voice Over Clients?

A Full-Solution Mixer for the Voice Over Studio

Voice Over Talent and some producers and directors ask me “How Do You Playback Audio to Voice Over Clients?” for remote recording sessions. Soundcraft recently released their new small format audio mixer the Signature 10. I’m pleased to report that it’s an all-in one solution for the voice over studio that makes that easy. It has:

1.) Great sounding mic preamps
2.) Solid USB Interface with nice converters
3.) Ability to playback any computer audio source to a director/client (including your DAW) without extra routing.

I added it to my voice over studio because I wanted a 2-in/2-out USB interface like the Focusrite Scarlett but with better preamps. Unfortunately with Scarlett interfaces, even when one goes line-in from an external preamp on the bigger Focusrite models, the audio still goes through the Scarlett preamp. That’s not terrible, but I wanted something better, with the ability to run a HPF as I recorded if possible. The Signature 10 mixer has its own downloadable ASIO driver, just like the Scarlett. So it’s an interface and preamp all-in-one. And yes, the preamps, conversion, and playback all sounds better on the Signature 10 for $300 street price.

The Game Changer: Playback any Audio to Your Clients

But this isn’t just a Soundcraft mixer…it’s an invaluable voice over tool! You can playback any audio source from your computer to the client without doing any routing tricks. The 9/10 Channel Fader controls the playback from your computer…and it goes right back down the main output as long as that it up. So anything you just recorded in ProTools or Audition you can just cue it up and play, and control the output with the fader. Any streaming sound from YouTube or Vimeo can go down the line too. And, as a bonus, this works with all the remote recording solutions like ipDTL, Skype, SessionLinkPro, Source Connect Now…well, anything that you are connected to. If the client can hear you, they will hear the playback on command.

The only trick to this is that you will need to Mute Channel 9/10 so that it doesn’t go to your DAW while recording, and then un-mute it when you want to do playback. In order to monitor in your headphones, you will have to engage the PFL (Pre Fader Listen) buttons near the faders on your mic channel and the 9/10 channel to hear your voice over director. Easy peasy! Or, if you want to get fancy, go ahead and don’t mute the client. But record stereo files and record your mic on the left channel and pan the client to the right. That can be very helpful when you want to hear the client feedback for notes when editing.

Update: I discussed this with voice over tech guru George Whittam and he said that the Yamaha AG03 also has this ability in a small travel-size mixer for half the price. If you don’t need the extra inputs, additional routing, nice EQ and preamps (although the Yamaha preamps are definitely professional-grade) then the AG03 is a great solution also. I think I’ll be getting one for my travel rig!

International Voice Over Production with Audiovisual Intelligence

International Voice Over Production with Audiovisual Intelligence

International Voice Over Production with Audiovisual Intelligence

I recently had the pleasure of discussing International Voice Over Production with Audiovisual Intelligence chief, Alex Jacobi. His company has two main studios: one in Dusseldorf, and their headquarters in Aachen, Germany. The studios feature a growing staff of 27 media experts. He founded the company over ten years ago when he made the switch from being a music producer to producing sound for commercial work. He realized that he would need a reliable roster of voice over talent for the amount of corporate video work he was producing. As a result, he decided to create a web tool for that, and sprechersprecher.de was born.

Today they are the largest voice casting company in Germany with a vast international scope. AI features over 12,000 voice over talents in over 40 languages. Along with sprechersprecher.de, Audiovisual Intelligence also has an online presence with their casting app Wundervoices. The app design helps producers find the exact voice talents they need. More importantly, these are all vetted native speakers: judged for their talent and studio specifications. You can listen to an excerpt from our interview here:

ipDTL for Remote International Recording

On the many projects that I have recorded for AI, we have used ipDTL to connect my Atlanta studio to their German studios. Alex Jacobi notes that ipDTL is fantastic not just because it’s a cheaper ISDN replacement, but because they work with global talents in their native countries, including Southeast Asia and Africa. For this, the ease of use and ubiquity of ipDTL makes it the great choice for remote international recording. Also, it even works with a Chromebook. Audiovisual Intelligence screens native speakers of dialects through two-to-three other native speakers for approval. They also work with native speakers to get the copy just right for multi-lingual productions. This is especially true for their work for FMCG (Fast Moving Consumer Goods) voice over clients.

Future Trends in Voice Over Casting

In conclusion, Alex Jacobi notes future trends in voice over casting are influenced by manufacturers now producing their commercials and videos internally with extensive marketing departments. However, marketers do not necessarily have the same skill set or expertise as the media producers and directors one would see on similar projects 20 years ago.  Casting companies need to provide voice over solutions and knowledge for them in many languages. That’s where Alex Jacobi’s company comes in to provide Audiovisual Intelligence.

Script Formatting for Voice Overs

Script Formatting for Voice Overs

Easy-to-Read Makes for Better Reads

This is an amazing story about copywriting: for the past 18 months I’ve enjoyed recording dozens of daily telephone prompts for an international audio-branding company. However, the copy has always been very hard to read. Single spaced lines and center aligned. 10 pt. font. Not very user-friendly Script Formatting for Voice Overs.

Before Christmas, I finally broke down and politely asked to change to 1.5 or double spaced lines and larger font. I suggested that this would also reduce the huge number of typos their writers made. I reformatted the scripts as an example for them to consider. I also acknowledged that I’m just some voice over talent and I know my place in the production chain! Today the scripts came in formatted per my suggestion. The Head Editor made the changes company wide! My producer contact said voice talents were turning around the copy faster and there were fewer typos. Everybody loved it.

The funny part is that previously the scripts had long sentences that were clunky for the spoken word. Voila! With the new formatting, all the writers are now writing zippy short-sentences.

Never use single spacing unless you have to!

Guidelines for Script Formatting for Voice Overs:

Here’s are some general standards to follow when formatting voice over scripts.

1.) Use 12 pt. font.

2.) Choose 1.5 or Double-spaced lines.

3.) Avoid narrow columns (difficult when story-boarding, I understand).

4.) DON’T WRITE IN ALL-CAPS! THIS IS AN AFFECTED THROWBACK FROM WHEN PRODUCTION PRINTERS OUTPUT ONLY IN ALL-CAPS.

5.) Use left-alignment, so that all the words have uniform spacing between them.

6.) Don’t use garbage fonts like Comic Sans or Papyrus.

7.) No, really, please don’t use garbage fonts. Thank you.

Following these guidelines won’t just help your voice over talent. It will help everyone in the production chain work more easily with the scripts. They’ll be easier to proof, mark-up, and follow along. It’s a win-win for everyone.

2016 Voice Over Year in Review

My 2016 Voice Over Year

My 2016 Voice Over Year in Review

2016 was a trying, stressful year for many of us. Fortunately, my family didn’t suffer any calamities. Well, a tree feel on my house. Our hot water heater caught on fire. But fortunately nobody was hurt!  My 2016 voice over year in review was thankfully rewarding and satisfying. I learned a lot. Tried to do things differently. Reach out to new people and new ways of thinking. Stray outside my comfort zone whenever possible. So here we are at the end of 2016, looking forward to a great 2017! Why has the year been so rewarding? Because I made a point of investing in my career.

Investing in My Brand

First off, I invested in getting a new professionally produced commercial demo to enhance my brand and marketability. I enlisted the coaching, directional, and audio production talents of Eric Romanowski at Ear Blowing Audio in Virgina Beach, Virginia. As I’m in Atlanta, we collaborated at length over emails and recorded the sessions via my ipDTL account. He really captured my money reads and then pushed some of it into new directions. And the investment has paid off, in ways I could not have expected. For example, I had never done television spots for toys and now I’ve done several for well known brands. On my own, I’ve compiled and edited my new audio and video demo reels for Corporate, E-learning, Explainer Video, and MOH/IVR voice overs from pieces of actual work.

Investing in My Relationships

Secondly, I invested in the time to learn from others. One of the best things I did this year was attend VO Atlanta in March for the first time. The panel discussions and seminars were outstanding, and it was great to meet so many people that I knew well online but not IRL! Plus, I got to meet new people in person that now I know well online too. I’ll be attending again this coming March. Come see me at the ipDTL booth where I’ll be available to discuss what it’s like to use it as voice over talent.

Speaking of ipDTL, I invested in the ‘Tel’ subscription of ipDTL. Not only can I bridge to ISDN on-demand, and stream live to studios; but it’s also a superior replacement for phone patch and Skype. It even works fantastic for connecting to mobile lines if I drop the rate to 64 kbps. So many of my clients love using it to direct sessions live, and it’s really made all those old cranky phone patch or Skype sessions sound so much better and go more smoothly.

Investing in My Voice Over Studio

When it comes to investing in one’s voice over career, there’s always the opportunity to upgrade one’s studio. I upgraded from Adobe Audition 3 to Audition CC. Yes, the monthly subscription is a bit much, but I think of it as an investment. It’s as if it is my monthly rent for my digital office. And it’s the price of doing business in a way that provides the best results for my clients.

I also upgraded from a CAD E100s microphone to a Rode NT-1. Same self-noise level but the Rode has a much hotter output and a more flattering tone for my voice. I love it! I’ve owned a TLM-103 and a MKH-416 in the past. The NT-1 sounds very similar to the 103 but with a tighter pattern; it also doesn’t sound tubby and phasey like a 416 can if you’re not working it closely. I also switched from the first generation Scarlett interface to the Second Generation Scarlett which is an improvement in so many ways: preamp, latency, controls, and in the ability to switch seamlessly between programs and sample rates. I’ve got my eye on the new Millennia one-channel preamp for an upgrade in 2017!

Finally, what I am most grateful for in 2016 are my repeat clients and my new clients that have become repeat clients in this year. One of the best parts of my job is building relationships with people from all kinds of businesses from all around the world. I look forward to working with all my clients in the new year.

ipDTL 3rd Anniversary Upgrades Remote Recording Voice Over Solution

ipDTL 3rd Anniversary Upgrades Voice Over Remote Recording Solution

ipDTL : Broadcast Quality Multi-Party Audio

In:Quality has launched its ipDTL 3rd Anniversary Upgrades Remote Recording Voice Over Solution. As a result of the new upgrades and features, ipDTL becomes the here-to-stay complete remote recording solution for live-directing of voice over sessions. The new Silver subscription allows 2 simultaneous connections of low-latency broadcast-quality audio and the Gold subscription makes 4 connections. Most of all, it lets you connect to anything: ip, ISDN, land lines, and mobile phones.

And, in a first for ip voice over products, one can record the incoming audio as mp3 or wav files! Here’s a .wav sample of one of the many recent tests I ran of the beta version of the upgrade. I’m joined in the test I recorded within ipDTL at my Atlanta studio by Jan Anderson from the San Francisco Bay Area and Andy Kavanagh from Newcastle in the United Kingdom.

First of all, check out this video from Kevin Leach of ipDTL explaining how the new features work:

 

ipDTL 3rd Anniversary Upgrades Remote Recording Voice Over Solution

With the new Third Anniversary beta updates, ipDTL can do what ISDN can’t:
1. Much lower latency
2. Lower latency with two simultaneous connections: with an additional option for four simultaneous connections in the premium studio versions.
3. The ability to solo inputs with PFL options via the interface mixer
4. The ability (finally!) to record the incoming audio via ipDTL
5. The ability to record the incoming audio and download as separate takes either as a high-resolution .mp3 or as a 48 kHz 16 bit stereo .wav file.
6. Live chat feature which will keep all parties connected online even if the audio or video connection is dropped.
7. Live collaborative script editor. Paste in your entire script from word!
8. With the new “Tel” and “Tel +” subscription options, you can also still bridge to ISDN on-demand 24/7/365
9. Also, with “Tel” you can connect to land lines. No more terrible Skype Connections
10. With “Tel +” you can connect to land and mobile phones and call ISDN lines. Standard Tel can only receive ISDN calls.

New Audio Mixer interface 

Let’s walk through the faders from left to right:

  1. Red fader controls the send level of your microphone
  2. Blue fader controls the level of the uploaded playback audio clips (another great ipDTL feature)
  3. Maroon fader controls the first ipDTL user you connect to.
  4. Orange fader controls the second ipDTL user you connect to.
  5. Black fader controls the total output of the mixer that you send ‘down the line’
  6. Finally, the Silver fader controls the mixed feed to the ‘Receive Audio’ device. It doesn’t include the audio you send down the line.

There will always be very good reasons to use ISDN for many applications. Live broadcast events springs to mind. However, as a production solution for live-direction of remote session voice overs, ipDTL is all-encompassing. The ipDTL 3rd Anniversary Upgrades Remote Recording Voice Over Solution is a comprehensive solution for media production: voice overs, music production, interviews, podcasting, and mult-party voice acting.

Don’t Settle for Skype! Use ipDTL

Because so many remote sessions are being done by producers on their cellphones or in conference calls, don’t settle for Skype to interface with.  Skype doesn’t cut it. Classic phone patch doesn’t cut it. The audio is terrible. How many times do you have to ask the talent “Um, I’m not sure if you said the plural S on the end of the product name in the fifth line?” Yet that won’t happen with ipDTL.  It’s been years since Skype promised a high-quality audio “Skype TX” and it was never delivered.

In conclusion, ipDTL has been good on its promises to improve every year and listen to the demands of the media production people that use it all over the world. As a result, the ipDTL 3rd Anniversary version delivers on being the complete remote recording voice over solution.

Find Out More about ipDTL

To get an ipDTL subscription, go to https://ipdtl.com/#getipdtl

To find out what voice over  and radio studios and voice talents around the world are using ipDTL, visit https://ipdtl.com/network/

Finally, to find out more general inquires and technical specs of ipDTL, please see https://ipdtl.com/faqs.php

10 Tips for Great Voice Over Recordings

10 Tips for Great Sounding Voice Over Recordings

10 Tips for Great Voice Over Recordings

How do you get that professional finished sound for voice overs from a home or remote studio? You don’t need to spend a lot of money on gear if you have no weak links in your audio chain. And you don’t need to have the best gear if you use it correctly. A U87 positioned incorrectly is not the best gear. Here are 10 Tips for Great Voice Over Recordings: including audio processing for corporate or E Learning clients that do not have post-production capabilities.

Pre and Post-recording audio tips

  1. Have a great sounding room. Make sure your recording area is quiet, with a noise floor of at least 60 dBFS. The room should have acoustic treatment with DIY or professionally built acoustic panels and bass traps. Some foam and absorbent blankets can help. The idea is to eliminate reverberation and any overstated low frequencies that create a tubby or muddy sound. Also watch out for close sound reflections that can come from a large desk area or a metal script stand. It’s a good idea to cover these with carpet samples. When I record close to a computer screen, I tilt it slightly away from me, so the sound isn’t reflecting straight back.
  2. Have a good microphone. While studios may ask specifically for a U87, TLM-103, or MKH 416, you don’t have to own one to get a great sound these days. There are so many manufacturers out there making great microphones. Look for a mic that has a consistent response pattern and low self-noise. Below 14 dB-A is ideal. Consider the pick-up pattern. A tight-patterned cardioid mic is good for recording voice, but if it’s too tight it’s difficult to stay on axis to do voice acting.
  3. Have a quality preamp Again, this doesn’t require the best gear. It’s how you use it. I’ve heard plenty of voice overs done with $2000-$3000 preamps that well, didn’t sound all that great. It’s all in how you use it. Whatever you use, if it has an on-board High Pass Filter (HPF) set to 100 Hz or higher, do not use it. There is a lot of sound in the voice between 70 Hz and 100 Hz, and the 100 Hz filter is essentially removing the lower octave resonance of the voice. It will sound thin! Filters set to 80 Hz and below are fine. Many new preamps and mixers are using 100 Hz HPF to ‘limit proximity effect’ but that should be resolved with better mic technique. Many audio interfaces now have good to excellent preamps built into them (Audient, Metric Halo, even the affordable Focusrite gear) so this might not even be an issue.
  4. Gain Staging. If you’re using an outboard preamp, set your gain there, and then send it line in to your audio interface. Important: make sure the gain on the interface is as low as possible. When you are running two higher sets of gain it’s a case of ‘too many cooks spoils the broth’. The sound will be veiled and muddy. Another thing to note is that you should set your recording levels to be between -20 dBFS and -12 dbFS on your DAW recording software. “dbFS” means “Decibels Relative to Full Scale” which is the decibel wave amplitude measurement in digital systems. -20 dBFS is the digital equivalent of the good old “0” in VU analogue recording. Don’t record things too hot. Keep it cool, and then turn up the volume heat after you record. For further explanation about recording levels for DAWs, check out this good article from Sound on Sound. In many ways, Gain Staging is arguably the most important of the 10 Tips for Great Voice Over Recordings!
  5. Record at 48 kHz /24 bit. Okay, okay…I know 44 kHz / 16 bit is all that is needed for excellent sound for the range of human hearing. However, if you are going to process the audio for post production, the effects will work a bit better with the higher rates. Then, you can down convert however you’d like.
  6. EQ I always send raw, unprocessed audio files to professional studios. But when I’m sending to corporate or E Learning clients that do not have dedicated audio engineers, I’ll do some gentle processing on my side. For EQing, I usually run a parametric EQ like the one below in Adobe Audition CC. The HPF is set to 70 Hz. There’s a little notch at 200 Hz to take out some muddiness. A slight bump at 3 kHz for presence, and two more at 12 and 18 kHz for ‘airyness’ or sheen. Note also that I EQ before running a compressor. I want the compressor to reduce the right frequencies. If I run the compressor first, it will react to the overstated frequencies.Voice Over EQ - 10 Tips for Great Voice Over Recordings
  7. Expanders – If the noise floor is at -60 dBFS, you don’t need an expander. But if it’s slightly above, I would recommend a gentle expander set to 2:1 at -60 dBFS. I usually set them to have the same attack and release as my compression, which is 8ms and 80ms respectively.
  8. Compression – I set my compression to 2:1 with 8 ms attack and 80 ms release. The threshold is set to where the compression never reduces more than -3 dB (the meter on the right in the picture below)Voice Over Compressor - 10 Tips for Great Voice Over Recordings
  9. Full Signal – If everything has gone right so far, all you need to do is raise the volume to peaks no higher than -3 dDBF. I want to give the end client some headroom when uploading their video or mixing in some music.
  10. Always check your video’s audio when it’s uploaded. On many occasions I’ve seen a client upload a voice over video and it was badly encoded on the upload with harsh or distorted sound. Most of the time this happens with YouTube, but also with some dedicated websites. QC your audio when it’s uploaded. If it doesn’t sound right, all it takes sometimes is just to re-upload the video.

Good luck, and I hope you found these 10 Tips for Great Voice Over Recordings helpful. Let me know in the comments what other tips and advice you have to share with others. Thanks!